Norwich University’s College of Graduate and Continuing Studies Partners with Ed Map to Drive Course Materials Affordability and Access

NELSONVILLE, Ohio, June 7, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Norwich University’s College of Graduate and Continuing Studies (CGCS), in Northfield, VT, has partnered with Ed Map, Inc. to provide its online students with course materials services. This decision is another validation of Ed Map’s ongoing development of its product roadmap and its customer service focus, as well as Ed Map’s pioneering Platform as a Service (PaaS) business model. The College, which provides all online students with course materials by the first day of class, will be utilizing the All-In Model by Ed Map (AIM) product.

Telemedicine startup, Regroup Therapy, lands $1.3M

Regroup Therapy, a telemedicine startup for mental health treatment, has raised another $1.3 million from backers that include former Walgreens CEO Greg Wasson.

The funding was led by Hyde Park Angels and included OCA Ventures; Impact Engine; Lon Chow; Grubhub co-founder Mike Evans; Wasson Enterprise, the family investment office of Greg Wasson; his wife, Kim; and brother, Stewart Wasson, also a former Walgreens executive. New Stack Ventures and Mark Agnew, president of Lou Malnati’s, also invested.

Levyx Raises $5.4M to Supercharge Big Data Processing Platforms Like Apache Spark

PALO ALTO & IRVINE, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Levyx Inc., whose high-performance processing technology dramatically reduces infrastructure costs associated with big-data applications, today announced the closing of a $5.4 million Series A round led by Chicago-based OCA Ventures. Additional investors include Palo Alto, Calif.-based Amino Capital (a.k.a. zPark Capital) and Sumavision USA Corporation, as well as individual executives from leading technology companies like EMC and SAP.

Alert Logic Surpasses $100 Million in Annualized Revenue

Houston, TX – April 20, 2016 — Alert Logic (www.alertlogic.com), the leading provider of Security-as-a-Service solutions for the cloud, today announced its Q1 2016 results. The company recorded $23.7 million in GAAP revenues for the quarter ending March 31, 2016, representing 31 percent year-over-year growth over Q1 2015, and achieved total contracted recurring revenue exceeding a $103 million annualized run-rate. Additionally, the company now has

more than 3,800 customers using its Security-as-a-Service solutions to protect their cloud, hybrid or on-premises IT infrastructure.

“Achieving $100 million in annualized run-rate is a significant milestone for a cybersecurity company,” said Gray Hall, CEO of Alert Logic. “This is undeniable evidence of strong cloud adoption and customer validation of our strategic approach to cybersecurity – combining market-leading technologies with 24×7 security monitoring and cloud deployability to secure business critical IT infrastructures.”

Alert Logic Reports Q4 2015 Results

Houston, TX – January 27, 2016 — Alert Logic, the leading provider of Security-as-a-Service solutions for the cloud, today announced that 2015 marked another year of record results. The company recorded $81 million in GAAP revenues for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2015, representing 40 percent growth over 2014. Alert Logic’s total recurring revenue under contract in the month of December exceeded a $98 million annualized run-rate, and the company now has more than 3,600 customers using its Security-as-a-Service solutions to protect their IT infrastructure running in any data center environment, including public cloud, hosting and on-premises data centers.

Gladwin’s $1.3 billion Cleversafe win could change the face of Chicago tech

Chris Gladwin has been swimming with sea turtles in the Bahamas. That’s what you do to unwind after you sell your tech company for $1.3 billion.

Gladwin, 52, was volunteering on a research project that involved actually chasing the critters down in the water—no particular sweat for an endurance athlete whose hobbies include orienteering races that can take a few hours or a few days.

The trip to count sea turtles was no accidental adventure. Gladwin did a similar trip to recharge his batteries after selling his last startup, MusicNow, a subscription digital music service.

Start-Ups Aim at Overlooked Demographic: The Unbanked

Last summer Jimmy Chen walked the streets of San Francisco trying to do simple financial transactions without a bank account, a task millions of Americans face.

It cost him $4 to cash a $20 personal check and $5 to send $30 to a relative — activities that would have been free with a bank account. When he needed to retrieve a money transfer, the process of verifying his identity took so long he almost gave up.

Ally Financial Announces Acquisition of TradeKing Group

DETROIT, April 5, 2016 — Ally Financial Inc. (NYSE: ALLY) today announced that it has signed an agreement to acquire TradeKing Group, Inc., a digital wealth management company. The transaction is expected to close in the third quarter and includes an online broker/dealer, a digital portfolio management platform, and educational content and social collaboration channels. The transaction is subject to regulatory approval from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) and compliance with the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act, as well as satisfaction of other customary closing conditions.

“The addition of wealth management is the next key step in Ally’s digital product evolution and will create a powerful combination of segment-leading direct banking and innovative investment services in a single integrated customer experience,” said Ally Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Brown. “This transaction presents a compelling opportunity for customers and a logical growth opportunity for Ally.”

The strongest players in carbon fiber 3D printing today

Incredible strength and stiffness, chemical and temperature resistance, electrical conductivity, and low weight on par with plastic parts: carbon fiber 3D printing has it all, and its poised to be the next major trend in industrial additive manufacturing.

While metal 3D printing has been skyrocketing in terms of popularity, market share, and high-demand applications for the past year, and will certainly continue to do so, 3D printing with carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) offers unique properties that are increasingly sought out in the aerospace, military, motorsports, robotics, automobile, and energy sectors. Namely, carbon fiber composites, which are made of extremely thin carbon fibers measuring about 5-10 microns in diameter, have a higher strength-to-weight ratio than almost any other manufacturing material. Imagine a conductive 3D printed part that is stronger than steel yet as light as plastic, and with a beautifully smooth surface finish: that’s carbon fiber 3D printing for you.

3-D Printing Promises to Change Manufacturing

Atoms, unlike bits, are hard to manipulate. Advances in how we rearrange them come slowly, but the payoff can be enormous.

Think new, never-before-seen products mass-produced from materials that once seemed exotic. Next to microchips, there is no more powerful unlocking technology than materials science.

Not long ago I held the product of such a potentially game-changing technology in my hands—a small, intricately detailed component for a valve. It looked like the shell of a nautilus from an alien planet. With its combination of lightness, strength and finish, the component felt very much like the future. And not just the next five years, but the next 50.

The object I held was unusual for two reasons: what it was made of, and how it was made.

It was made of carbon fiber, a man-made material used in airplanes, race cars and wind turbines that is stronger, ounce for ounce, than steel or aluminum. But it is expensive, and surprisingly labor intensive to make, requiring workers to cut, layer and mold sheets of plastic infused with carbon fiber—an oddly 18th century approach to making a 21st century material.

This carbon-fiber component had been made on a 3-D printer, a gadget more often associated with spitting out plastic novelties.

Marry those two technologies, and things get interesting. The all-electric BMW i3 has a carbon-fiber frame that extends its range by making it significantly lighter. Other possibilities include light but strong parts for drones and other aircraft, as well as replacing materials in many everyday objects—from furniture to machine tools—with carbon fiber.

“We give you the strength of metal for the cost of plastics,” says Greg Mark, chief executive of MarkForged Inc., a Cambridge, Mass., company founded in 2013 that sells a machine that 3-D prints carbon-fiber composites.

The printer costs $5,000 and is being used by at least one automotive manufacturer to make parts for the machines that make cars, according to Mr. Mark. The company won’t say which, but Nissan Motor Co. is listed as a customer on MarkForged’s website. “We like to tell people we’re the parts behind the part,” says Mr. Mark.

Nissan didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Today, such parts are most often made by machinists using computerized mills to carve solid blocks of metal. (This also is, incidentally, how the body of Apple Inc.’s laptops is produced.)

By replacing milled metal parts with equally hard printed carbon fiber composite parts, MarkForged says it allows machinists and their factories to be more nimble—trying and discarding new ideas in days rather than weeks.

MarkForged’s 3-D printer works like a “traditional” 3-D printer in that it has two print heads, one that squirts plastic to build a part, and a second one that pushes out the carbon fiber to reinforce it, one layer at a time. Unlike traditional carbon fiber parts, there is no wasted material, says Mr. Mark.

A competing carbon-fiber 3D-printing technology is taking on a potentially bigger opportunity—the method for producing the overwhelming majority of plastic parts.

“Our long-term goal is to replace injection molding,” says Robert Swartz, founder and chief technical officer of Impossible Objects LLC, which recently unveiled a machine that can 3-D print composites with a huge variety of materials.

Chicago-based Impossible Objects’ process combines fabrics such as silk, polyester, Kevlar, cotton or carbon fiber with any 3-D printable plastic, including ones used for high-temperature applications.

Impossible Objects’ process differs from previous 3D-printing technologies. Instead of printing an object one layer atop the other, every layer of the object can be printed at once, in two dimensions, on a large sheet of fabric. The layers are then cut out and stacked one on top of the other, like a layer cake, and baked in an oven.

The machine operates on the same principles as an inkjet printer, spraying the plastic out of print heads as tiny droplets, at high speed. That means it eventually could be fast, says Mr. Swartz. The maturity of traditional 2-D printing, on which Mr. Swartz’s process is based, makes him think it could someday be relatively inexpensive.

Neither company will be raking in billions anytime soon. In the world of stuff, nothing moves quickly, in part because new manufacturing processes must be thoroughly vetted.

That said, Impossible Objects’ printer also could print big objects because some inkjet printers are as large as a bus. That could mean 3-D printing entire body panels for a car, for example, or maybe even the car itself. That would lead to vehicles substantially lighter than current models, which in turn could give electric cars unprecedented range.

Both men want to change how we make things—and the things we make.

The legions of cheap 3-D printers on the market now are mere toys compared with what is coming because they can’t produce parts strong enough for most uses. Once we can make things that are usable in the real world right at our desks—or at the nearest copy shop—3-D printing could have its “PC moment.”

Traditional manufacturing won’t go away—we still make glass in essentially the same way as the Romans, after all—but it may never be the same again.