The best budgeting apps to use right now

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  • Top budgeting app overall: Mint
  • Best checking account with built-in budgeting app: Simple
  • Best budgeting app for couples: Zeta
  • Best budgeting app for reducing bill payments: Trim
  • Best for learning more about money: Charlie
  • Need more information? Scroll down to read about these apps and how we chose them.

Budgeting looks different for each person.

Maybe you want to track your spending habits, or find ways to spend less and save more, or budget effectively as a couple — or you might have multiple budgeting goals.

Regardless of what you’re hoping to accomplish, finding the right app can make the process easier and more effective.

In our search for the best budgeting apps, we considered what might be important to different people when sticking to a budget. Budgeting can already feel difficult, so above all else, we made sure our top picks are easy to use. The easier the process, the likelier you are to keep engaging with your money. 

Check out our picks for best budgeting apps, and scroll to the bottom to read more about how we chose the winners.

Mint: Best budgeting app overall

Why it stands out: The Mint app is owned by Intuit, the financial software company that also owns TurboTax and Quickbooks. Link your bank accounts to Mint for the app to create a budget based on your past spending habits. The app splits your expenses into categories such as shopping, bills, and transportation. If you think Mint allotted too much or too little money for one category, you can easily change the settings yourself or create a new category — so Mint does all the hard work for you, but you still have some control. 

Mint makes it easy to save for multiple goals. Create a goal, including your estimated costs and timeline, and Mint factors the plan into your budget.

Mint is easy to use and helpful for understanding your finances on a large scale. In addition to showing your income, expenses, and savings goals, it also displays factors like your credit score, investments, and net worth.

Pricing: Free

Look out for: Categorization mistakes. Occasionally, Mint will place a transaction in one category (like transportation) when it should actually be in a different category (like bills). You do have the ability to reassign the transaction to another category within the app, or create your own category.

Simple: Best checking account with a built-in budgeting app

Why it stands out: Simple is primarily a bank account, and its online checking account comes with budgeting features. Instead of having two apps for your bank and your budget, you can keep it all in one place.

Set up recurring monthly payments, such as groceries or rent, and Simple will automatically store the money in the “Expenses” section. To save for a goal, set up automatic savings or enter your target date and amount for Simple to regularly set aside money for you.

With its Safe-to-Spend feature, Simple tells you how much you can spend on non-essentials without going over budget. The app also shows how much you’ve spent in different categories each month so you can see where you have more wiggle room or where you need to cut back.

When you set up a Simple online checking account, you can also sign up for a partner Protected Goals Account to save for big expenses and earn 1.40% APY toward savings goals. This app is great for setting and working toward financial objectives, so it could be a good fit for goal-oriented people.

Pricing: Free

Look out for: Setting up the app may feel complicated. Because Simple is primarily a bank account, creating an account takes more time and effort than the other apps on our list.

Zeta: Best for couples

Why it stands out: Zeta is a budgeting app designed specifically for couples. Zeta displays all your individual and shared finances in one place, and it gives you the option to hide certain financial information from your partner. It’s a good option for couples who have combined their finances or for those who prefer to bank separately.

With Zeta, you can set personal and combined financial goals. The app sends you both monthly reminders to set “money dates,” making it a good tool for learning to communicate about your finances.

Pricing: Free

Look out for: The website. The Zeta mobile app has an easy-to-use interface, but its website is outdated and difficult to navigate.

Trim: Best for automatically reducing bill payments

Why it stands out: Trim analyzes your bills and spending habits and reveals where in your budget you can save money. Trim’s most unique feature is Bill Negotiation — the app analyzes your internet, phone, cable, and wireless bills and determines whether you can get the same service with the company for a lower price. This feature could potentially save you hundreds of dollars in a year, which you can then put toward other expenses, save, or invest.

Pricing: It’s free to sign up for Trim. If you agree to Trim’s proposed bill negotiations, you’ll pay a 33% of what Trim saves you in a year in one lump sum.

You may choose to pay $99 per year for Trim Premium, which includes features such as medical bill negotiation, credit card rate negotiation, and unlimited access to a financial coach via email. Bill Negotiation is included in a Trim Premium membership, so you won’t have to pay 33% on top of the annual membership fee.

Look out for: How long you plan to pay a bill. When Trim negotiates a bill, you pay 33% of whatever it will save you for the year in one lump sum. If you plan to change your internet, cable, phone, or wireless provider in the next year, you could actually end up losing money.

Also, note that Trim is not downloadable as an app on the Apple or Google Play store. Instead, it’s available through Facebook Messenger, or you can sign up via email.

Charlie: Best for learning more about money

Why it stands out: Charlie is a budgeting app with an intuitive design, easy-to-use interface, and friendly penguin mascot (aka Charlie). It’s a good app for beginners who want to learn more about how to budget because it provides information in an unintimidating way.

Charlie the penguin is a chatbot, so you can text it questions about your finances. The app also sends you push notifications every day about ways to budget and save, which provide regular opportunities to learn about money. Setting up a budget with the app is easy, and Charlie’s approachability can help you build the habit of thinking about and engaging with your money.

Pricing: Free

Look out for: Push notifications and ads. While the push notifications can be helpful, they’re also persistent, which may become annoying. Some of these push notifications are ads for other financial products and services, which you may or may not find useful. Note that you can choose to disable the push notifications.

Others we considered and why they didn’t make the cut:

  • You Need a Budget: This app is designed to help you get out of debt and stop living paycheck-to-paycheck — but it takes a long time to set up, has an elaborate interface, and costs $11.99 per month.
  • Clarity Money: This is a good option for people who want to see their income, spending, credit score, account balances, and debt all in one place, but its features aren’t as robust as what you get with Mint.
  • Wally: Wally helps you track your spending by taking pictures of receipts, but it isn’t available in the Google Play store.
  • PocketGuard: It’s easy to visualize your spending with this app, but the charts and graphs aren’t always accurate if PocketGuard doesn’t categorize your transactions correctly.
  • MVelopes: When you link your bank account to MVelopes, it provides a digital version of the “envelope method” in which you track your spending by keeping money for in separate envelopes based on the category — but you’ll spend at least $6 per month for the most basic version.
  • GoodBudget: GoodBudget offers a free version of the “envelope method,” but it doesn’t link to your bank account, so you have to be disciplined enough to enter every transaction manually.
  • Personal Capital: Personal Capital includes spending and net-worth tracking features, but it’s primarily an investment tool.
  • EveryDollar: EveryDollar’s free version helps you track expenses and set goals, but it doesn’t monitor your net worth or credit score like Mint does.
  • Albert: This free app tracks your spending and alerts you if you’re at risk of overdrafting, but it isn’t as strong as our top picks.
  • CountAbout: One feature of CountAbout is that you can import data from Mint — but considering Mint is free and CountAbout costs $9.99 per year, you’re better off just downloading Mint.
  • PocketSmith: PocketSmith requires you to enter all your transactions manually, and its features aren’t intuitive.
  • Wismo: Wismo is a hybrid social media platform and budgeting app, so you won’t get the full experience unless your friends and family also use the app.

Frequently asked questions:

Why trust our recommendations?

Personal Finance Insider’s mission is to help smart people make the best decisions with their money. We understand that “best” is often subjective, so in addition to highlighting the clear benefits of a financial product, we outline the limitations, too. We spent hours testing budgeting apps, and we compared and contrasted the features  of various apps so you don’t have to.

How did we chose the best budgeting apps?

If you care about tracking your expenses, you probably don’t want to pay a lot of money to create a budget. For this reason, cost was a huge factor in determining our list. 

We compared over a dozen budgeting apps, honing in on their features, ease of use, and availability for multiple devices. Our editorial team tested and evaluated our potential top choices.

Finally, we cross-referenced our research against popular comparison sites like Investopedia, The Balance, and NerdWallet to make sure we didn’t miss a thing. 

What is the best budgeting app for beginners?

In most cases, the best budgeting app for beginners will be one that makes budgeting easy — this means it has an easy-to-use interface and links to your accounts so you don’t have to enter every transaction manually. It can also be good to have an app that teaches you about money. For these reasons, the best budgeting apps for beginners right now are MintCharlie, and Clarity Money.

What is the best free budgeting app?

Mint is completely free to download and use, and there are no paid membership options. Mint links to your bank account and monitors multiple aspects of your finances, including your income, spending, investments, credit score, and net worth.

The QL Gaming Group, Parent Company of BetQL, Acquires Accuscore and Raises Additional $1.1 Million

NEW YORK, May 6, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The QL Gaming Group (QLGG), a leading direct to consumer sports data and iGaming affiliate platform, today announced an additional $1.1 million in funding, as well as the acquisition of Finnish sports simulation company, Accuscore. The combined announcement will expand the capabilities of BetQL, QLGG’s sports betting analytics platform for casual bettors and will accelerate the launch of BetQL’s player prop and in-game predictions and more sports like International pro soccer, tennis, golf and eSports.

The round was led by Tim and Todd McSweeney, with participation by Boston Seed Capital, Karlani Capital, Subversive Capital, Rob Seaver and Jere Doyle. QL Gaming, formerly known as RotoQL, has now raised $8.3 million from investors that have also included the late David Stern, former commissioner of the NBA, John Kosner, Stern’s former partner at Micromanagement Ventures and former William Hill chief Ralph Topping.

“Our thesis is betting properties with the best data and analytics will win, and our acquisition of Accuscore vastly increases our IP, grows our marketplace position and puts us in a very strong place as the sports world returns to active play in the near future,” said Justin Park, QL Gaming CEO. “Our new and long term investors are very bullish on the casual gaming and sports betting market, and we are now poised to emerge stronger.”

“We are thrilled to join QL Gaming,” Accuscore CEO Tuomas Kanervala, added. “Their expertise around customer facing sports data products is unrivaled and will help both our B2C and B2B businesses. The latter will serve as the foundation for soon to be launched BetQL B2B that will help sportsbook operators and media companies acquire and retain bettors.”

The injection of capital will be used to further accelerate BetQL’s growth, which boasted a 200% increase in subscription sales from 2018 to 2019. In just 18 months of launch, BetQL has acquired over 300,000 free users, 10,000 paying customers and is already a seven figure business. Funds will also supercharge BetQL’s burgeoning affiliate marketing business which has partnered with ten operators in Indiana, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

QL Gaming initially launched in September 2015 as RotoQL to provide data and analytics to daily fantasy sports (DFS). “DraftKings and FanDuel’s dominance of the regulated betting market in NJ can be attributed to their pole position in DFS,” added Peter Blacklow, Managing Partner at Boston Seed Capital, who led the seed rounds for both QLGG and DraftKings. “The same is going to be true of QL Gaming and the media opportunity around betting. The team’s mastery of engaging DFS players through data is carrying over seamlessly to sports betting audiences.”

ABOUT QL GAMING GROUP
The QL Gaming Group, based in New York City, is a direct to consumer sports data and iGaming affiliate platform. QLGG’s mission is to educate sports fans and ultimately increase betting’s entertainment per dollar ratio through data-driven products like BetQL. The company was founded in 2015 by Justin Park and Mike Shiekman. Learn more about QL Gaming Group: https://qlgaminggroup.com/. Learn more about BetQL: https://betql.co/.

ABOUT ACCUSCORE
Accuscore has developed and refined models to accurately predict the outcome of sporting events. More specifically, the algorithms simulate the outcome of games approximately 10,000 times and takes into account past player performance, team composition, weather, coaching staff and more. Accuscore covers all major US sports and 13 global soccer leagues. The company licenses their predictive data directly to consumers and to media companies and sportsbook operators. Learn more about Accuscore: https://accuscore.com/.